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I think the one thing I truly wasn’t prepared for going into student teaching (finished my first full week Friday) was the lack of “me” time. I’m either at school, asleep, or wishing I was asleep during the weekdays.

Don’t get me wrong - I love it so far. I can see where I have so much to learn and a lot of growing to do. But somehow I need to find time for reflection. I’d really like to be more active on this tumblr posting wise, though I know I probably won’t have the time to actively participate with my dashboard.

Oh work/life balance.

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Posted at 10:25 PM 25 August 2012

Changing Majors Is No Big Deal if the Timing Is Right, Studies Find

world-shaker:

When students change their majors, the decision is often thought to create a significant stumbling block in their march toward a degree.

But a pair of studies being presented this week at the annual meeting of the Association for Institutional Research suggests that changing majors happens far less often than is widely assumed, and that it does little harm when it occurs early in a student’s college career.

Some interesting results. Click through to read more.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

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Posted at 9:12 AM 04 June 2012

allisonunsupervised answered your question: The problem with there being so much time in…

Frankly, I think you’re right to be concerned. How many hours do you think you’d work?

I’m not entirely sure. More than likely weekends. Possibly a day or two during the week, as well.

I’m not sure what they’ll consider part time. Though I know full time at the Pizza Hut here in town is considered 20-25 hours a week. 

The other advantage in being able to keep the job is that I’ll still have it once I graduate in December—finding a full time position mid-year is pretty challenging as far as I’ve been lead to understand (and I have no reason to doubt that), so having it and the ability to sub and gain experience/get my name out there is a nice cushion to have in the back of my mind.

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Posted at 10:19 PM 03 June 2012

The problem with there being so much time in between my last practicum and student teaching is that I get jitters about thinking of stepping into a classroom and taking over.

I know once I get in there and get going and see how things work I’ll be fine. But it’s the next two and a half months-ish until then that I have to be jittery whenever I think about it.

At least this summer I’m finally able to have a job (no place has been willing to hire me for just as summer position before, which was all I was previously around for), plus I’m hoping to get back involved with my local scout troop again.

Question for anyone: did you also work a job while you student taught? Was it difficult to manage both? I’m hoping to work at Pizza Hut while I student teach, for gas money and to hopefully stay off my parent’s budget (who are letting me live at home, generous and, in my mother’s case, clingy people that they are), but I’m worried that I’ll have problems keeping both in balance.

Thoughts?

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Posted at 10:07 PM 03 June 2012
One of the myths of creativity is that very few people are really creative,” said former education professor, author, and TED speaker Ken Robinson, in a statement released to coincide with the report. “The truth is that everyone has great capacities, but not everyone develops them. One of the problems is that too often our educational systems don’t enable students to develop their natural creative powers. Instead, they promote uniformity and standardization. The result is that we’re draining people of their creative possibilities and, as this study reveals, producing a workforce that’s conditioned to prioritize conformity over creativity.

Education System Stifles Creativity, Survey Finds

As much as I love and respect the work of Ken Robinson, I’m hitting a breaking point. If America is tired of it’s underfunded education system failing, then they need to recognize the following:

You either value education, or you don’t.

It’s that simple.

You either care enough to demand that state and federal governments stop slashing your funding for education (paid for by your tax dollars) instead of giving themselves pay raises and fighting for tax loopholes and breaks for millionaires and billionaires, or you don’t.

You either care enough to demand that we pay teachers a decent wage (since those vile liberal Communist Socialists also spend all day with your children, mentoring, tutoring, sometimes parenting, but generally taking care of them above and beyond what you will ever comprehend), or you don’t.

You either believe that repeated high-stakes standardized testing forces your children to learn how to take a test rather than think critically (because if their multiple test scores are too low the district will lose funding and the teacher may lose their job), or you don’t.

It’s simple. It really, really is.

(via world-shaker)

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

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Posted at 11:53 AM 04 May 2012
ilovecharts:

A informational chart about how to make one of my favourite things… Coffee.

What’s it called when you use up the last of your creamer and almost all your remaining coffee to make a bit pot of something that must be drank before you can head back home?

ilovecharts:

A informational chart about how to make one of my favourite things… Coffee.

What’s it called when you use up the last of your creamer and almost all your remaining coffee to make a bit pot of something that must be drank before you can head back home?

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Posted at 11:51 AM 04 May 2012

A Quick List

1. Congratulations to everyone who has survived their finals week! And if you’re still surviving yours or waiting to begin it, best of luck to you! If I survived my last one, I’m sure you can beat yours, too. (guess where I’ve been for the past week? :P )

2. To anyone who completed a recital this year—congratulations to you as well! And to anyone planning one, best of luck to you! It’s a lot of work, but as I’ve discovered they can also be a lot of fun.

2. Thank you for all the helpful answers to my last question. Looks like pretty much what you were all suggesting—a short blurb about my professional interests and activities related to music and other areas. I had a feeling it wasn’t my life story—but always better safe than sorry.

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Posted at 1:36 PM 03 May 2012

Student Teaching: Biography?

I just found out my placement for my student teaching next semester, and I’m excited that I’ll be getting to work with the teacher that I was hoping for!

However, the school wants three things from me: (1) resume, (2) teaching philosophy statement, and (3) a biography.

The first two make sense to me—but the biography confuses me a little. Do they want my life story (unlikely), or a just a short blurb?

I’m going to go check with my advisor to find out, but I’m curious to know from anyone else who has or is student teaching if this is pretty common?

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Posted at 12:25 PM 24 April 2012
Instead of saying “I don’t have time” try saying “it’s not a priority,” and see how that feels. Often, that’s a perfectly adequate explanation. I have time to iron my sheets, I just don’t want to. But other things are harder. Try it: “I’m not going to edit your résumé, sweetie, because it’s not a priority.” “I don’t go to the doctor because my health is not a priority.” If these phrases don’t sit well, that’s the point. Changing our language reminds us that time is a choice. If we don’t like how we’re spending an hour, we can choose differently.

Fascinating Wall Street Journal Article on being busy (via tissah)

A great article to think about on Sunday morning

(via maebergan)

today, in things I need to work on.

(via megburns)

I have been trying to make this point for years.

(via haygirlhay)

One of my professors made us start thinking this way during my class on classroom management. We were reading Stephen Covey’s First Things First, which has some tips on time management. 

(via lhuddles)

Oh, I like this.

I like this a lot.

(via iamlittlei)

I’m going to try this.

(Source: katykelley, via iamlittlei)

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Posted at 8:02 PM 22 April 2012